Violence Prevention

Periodically, windows of opportunities arise for providing inservice at schools about mental health and psychosocial concerns. When such opportunities appear, it may be helpful to access one or more of our Center's Quick Training Aids.

Each of these offers a brief set of resources to guide those providing an inservice session. (They also are a form of quick self-tutorial.)    

Most encompass    
  • key talking points for a short training session    
  • a brief overview of the topic    
  • facts sheets    
  • tools    
  • a sampling of other related information and resources
  • In compiling resource material, the Center tries to identify those that represent "best practice" standards. If you know of better material, please let us know so that we can make improvements.

    Guide for Suggested Talking Points

    1. Brief Overview

    1. Present main points from:
      What works in Violence Prevention - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. Highlights the points that safe schools, violence prevention, and conflict reduction all are of major concerns in addressing barriers to learning. It highlights several approaches that don't work such as scare tactics, and offers insight into those that do including comprehensive programs and involving families, communities, and schools
         

  • Facts
    1. The Youth Violence - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This fact sheet can be incorporated into a slide and/or handout for presentation.
         
      2. Possible points for discussion include gender differences in youth violence rates. Also, the sharp increase in youth violence and the carrying of weapons by high school students.
         
    2. Statistics on School Violence - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This sheet provides statistical sheet information on crime victimization, weapon possession, fighting, other assaults, and feeling safe at school.
          

  • Tools/Handouts - What can policy makers, schools, teachers, parents, and students do?
    1. Working Together to Create Safe Schools - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This document can be used as a handout. It provides a list of ideas and activities that will work to create a safer school environment. Many of these ideas may be initiated and carried out by school-site principals or parents' groups working with local school administrators or by school district public relations directors, working cooperatively with school superintendents and other district administrators. might arise in discussion or in planning, but are not critical to hand out to everyone.i
         
    2. Elements for an Effective Prevention Program - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This should be used as a checklist or guide. It is a comprehensive overview concerns effective for choosing or developing an effective program.
         
    3. Early Warning, Timely Response: A Guide to Safe Schools - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This should be used as a guide. It presents a brief summary of the research on violence prevention and intervention and crisis response in schools. It provides school communities with suggestions on what to look for and what to do in response to issues that may arise
         
    4. Action Steps for Students - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This should be used as a checklist. It presents some ideas that students in other schools tried to prevent violence and create safer schools.
         
    5. Involving Parents in School Violence Programs - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. Highlights the steps parents can take to prevent and reduce violence in schools.
         

  • Training Programs, Models, Initiatives
    1. Safe Communities ~ Safe Schools Model Sheet - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This should be used as a guide. Highlights the components of a safe school plan. It addresses both the behavioral and property protection aspects of violence prevention.
         
    2. Blueprint for Violence Prevention - Excerpted from a Center introductory packet entitled Violence Prevention and Safe Schools
        
      1. This model has been developed to provide step-by-step instructions to assist communities in planning and implementing youth crime and violence prevention projects.
         

  • Additional Resources
    1. QuickFind on Violence Prevention (printer-friendly format)
      To view the web-based quick find on Violence prevention, click here
    2. Crisis Assistance and Prevention: A Self-study Survey

  • Originals for Overheads
  • The following can be copied to overhead transparencies to assist in presenting this material.
    1. The Youth Violence Problem
    2. Who Needs To Work Together
    3. What Works in Violence Prevention
    4. Components of Safe School Plan


    This material provided by: UCLA Center for Mental Health in Schools/Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563
    (310) 825-3634/ Fax: (310) 206-8716/ Email: smhp@ucla.edu

    Note: Documents in PDF format ( identified with a )
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